Crown Royal TM Suit Survives Summary Judgment Against “Crown Club”

Crown-Royal

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In March 2013, Diageo North America, Inc., which owns the Canadian Whiskey brand “Crown Royal,” filed various trademark and unfair competition claims against Mexcor, Inc. and EJMV Investments, LLC.  Diageo alleged that Defendants have been selling “directly-competing Canadian whisky products” under various brands “dominated by the term ‘CROWN,’ including Texas CROWN Club, Florida CROWN Club … and South Carolina CROWN Club.” Diageo alleged that this issue was compounded by Defendants’ packaging of the products in “imitative bags … violate Diageo’s rights in [its] Purple Bag mark” and “unfairly imitate the overall look and feel of Diageo’s CROWN ROYAL® product line.”  In sum, Diageo claimed that consumers will mistakenly believe that [Defendants’] whiskeys are “affiliated with, sponsored by, approved by, or associated with Crown Royal” and/or that they “are regional variations or novelty line extensions of Crown Royal.”

Fast forward 20 months to the present and the case is now set to go to trial on December 3, 2014.  Both parties had filed motions for summary judgment that were all rejected by the court in an October 27th Order that did not elaborate as to the reasons for the denials.

Specifically Defendants’ motions sought summary judgment (1) as to trademark dilution on the grounds that the Crown Royal trademarks were not “famous” (2) on all claims based on laches and limitations, and (3) on the trademark infringement and unfair competition claim.   For its part, Diageo sought summary judgment on its trademark infringement, unfair competition, and false designation of origin claims.

The lack of any elaboration by the Court in its order likely means that it views issues of fact as precluding summary judgment on any of the motions.

With respect to the laches and limitations motion, Defendants claimed that they had been using the “CROWN” word mark on bottles in conjunction with velvet bags since 2008.  Diageo’s Response disputed those facts and also focused on the doctrine of progressive encroachment, which “allows a trademark owner to tolerate de minimis or low-level infringements and still have the right to act promptly when a junior user either gradually edges into causing serious harm or suddenly expands or changes its mark.”  This is an important principle to keep in mind for any brand owner.   A brand owner might be at risk of a trademark infringement suit by expanding its product lines or its geographic scope.  Thus, even if such a suit seems like a remote possibility when a trademark is adopted, strong consideration should be given to future events, especially if the brand might potentially be expanded or sold.

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