Ghirardelli Settles “White Chocolate” Labeling Suit for $5.25 Million

White-Chips

Ghirardelli Chocolate Co. has agreed to pay approximately $5.25 million to resolve a putative class action that accused the company of improperly advertising certain products as containing “white chocolate” when they failed to contain cocoa butter, which is required for “white chocolate” or “white chocolate flavor” under FDA regulations.  A motion for preliminary approval of the proposed class settlement was filed on August 20th, with the settlement also providing that Ghirardelli make certain changes to its labeling.

Notably, the front labels for all of the targeted products, listed below, include the company name, Ghirardelli Chocolate, as shown in the above image:

a. Ghirardelli® Chocolate – Premium Baking Chips- Classic White,
b. Ghirardelli® Chocolate – White Chocolate Flavored Confectionary Coating Wafers,
c. Ghirardelli® Chocolate – Sweet Ground White Chocolate Flavor,
d. Ghirardelli® Chocolate – Premium Hot Beverage- White Mocha, and
e. Ghirardelli® Chocolate – Frappe Classico – Classic White

However, none of these products are specifically identified as “white chocolate,” in contrast to many other Ghirardelli products that include real coca butter.  Plaintiffs nevertheless argued that, for a variety of reasons, the labels were inconsistent with FDA regulations and that labels are misleading because consumers would reasonably believe that the products include “white chocolate.”

For example, the packaging of the [Classic White Baking Chips] prominently uses the term”chocolate” in the company name “Ghirardelli® Chocolate.”  It refers to the product as “Classic White” to deceptively mislead consumers into believing that it is classic white chocolate.  It states that the product is “Premium” leading consumers to incorrectly believe that, unlike its competitors, the product is a premium white chocolate chip product.  It then goes on to deceptively state [on the reverse]: “The luxuriously deep flavor and smooth texture of Ghirardelli Premium Baking Chocolate delivers the ultimate chocolate indulgence.”  But because there is no chocolate or white chocolate in Defendants’ chips, the product cannot deliver a “deep chocolate flavor or texture” or the “ultimate chocolate indulgence.”  The label further says [on the reverse] that the product contains the “Finest grind for smoothest texture and easiest melting” but in fact, unlike real white chocolate, the product is not “ground” from cocoa beans.

Per Law360, Ghirardelli stands behind the accuracy of its labeling and marketing but “opted to settle the suit to avoid the ‘expense and distractions’ of litigating what it believes to be ‘nuisance allegations.'”

This case highlights the dangers of including regulated terms in a company name/trademark and the need to scrutinize marketing language across product lines.  In this regard, in evaluating the risk of a lawsuit, the question is not whether you believe that reasonable consumers are misled by a label, but whether a colorable argument exists that consumers might be misled (thus creating the risk of a colorable lawsuit).  

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